siftbot says...

Self promoting this video and sending it back into the queue for one more try; last queued Wednesday, January 26th, 2011 4:09pm PST - promote requested by original submitter nomino.

spoco2 says...

Sorry, but without any sort of background, I can't upvote at all.

Why are they revolting? What has been done to them? Etc. etc.

All I'm seeing is a collection of violent protesters, and that never makes me side with them without really good reason.

I've tried looking into it, but have found nothing that really deals with what their grievances actually are.

nomino says...

Wow. Are you serious? How do you not know what is gong on over there?

They are revolting because they are tired of living under a dictator (Mubarak). They are tired of living in a country that tortures and kills any dissenter. They are tired of being piss poor while their leaders live in massive Dubai-esque palaces because corruption is so wide-spread they don't even try to hide it anymore. It started in Tunisia about a month ago and democracy is starting to spread to neighbouring countries in the middle east....

Here are some links....
NYT
Tunisia [cole's notes-ish]


>> ^spoco2:

Sorry, but without any sort of background, I can't upvote at all.
Why are they revolting? What has been done to them? Etc. etc.
All I'm seeing is a collection of violent protesters, and that never makes me side with them without really good reason.
I've tried looking into it, but have found nothing that really deals with what their grievances actually are.

spoco2 says...

@nomino : I didn't know about it because I don't watch the news, and get most of my news from Melbourne, Australia's major broadsheet newspaper's website: http://www.theage.com.au/

If you go there you'll see you have to scroll down quite some way before you see any mention of what's going on.

Having said that I haven't even read any news for days either, have been flat chat with 'life' stuff.

So yeah, sometimes things slip me by. I will upvote now though as it certainly seems like just protests.

aspartam says...

*quality indeed.

Morning Joe, MSNBC top stories include:
-a glossing over of this
-derek jeter rumors
-2012 race speculation
<3 american media

No wonder no one knows about this.

>> ^spoco2:

Sorry, but without any sort of background, I can't upvote at all.
Why are they revolting? What has been done to them? Etc. etc.
All I'm seeing is a collection of violent protesters, and that never makes me side with them without really good reason.
I've tried looking into it, but have found nothing that really deals with what their grievances actually are.

aspartam says...

It's all good. Powerful Governments and by extension, media conglomerates, don't like its people to realize that spreading democracy doesn't have to cost trillions of dollars and thousands of lives.

>> ^spoco2:

@<a rel="nofollow" href="http://videosift.com/member/nomino" title="member since May 30th, 2008" class="profilelink">nomino : I didn't know about it because I don't watch the news, and get most of my news from Melbourne, Australia's major broadsheet newspaper's website: http://www.theage.com.au/
If you go there you'll see you have to scroll down quite some way before you see any mention of what's going on.
Having said that I haven't even read any news for days either, have been flat chat with 'life' stuff.
So yeah, sometimes things slip me by. I will upvote now though as it certainly seems like just protests.

GDGD says...

Resisting the urge to implement the 'let me google that for you.' As I am sure you can find the site, allow me to suggest the search phrase "why is egypt protesting." I would then encourage you to investigate the first link [at the time of writing this] under the news splash.

"Still, there was no indication that Mubarak, who has ruled with an iron fist for nearly 30 years, intends to relinquish power or make democratic or economic concessions, and no sign he would rein in his security forces."

"Although Wednesday's demonstrations were smaller than the tens of thousands who rallied a day earlier, the latest unrest follows repeated public outcries in recent months over police brutality, food prices, corruption and, more recently, sectarian strife between Christians and Muslims."

"There is considerable public opposition to a father-son succession and, according to leaked U.S. diplomatic memos, such a scenario does not meet with the approval of the powerful military. Still, the regime's tight hold on power has made it virtually impossible for any serious alternative to Mubarak to emerge."

"Nearly half of Egypt's 80 million people live under or just above the poverty line set by the World Bank at $2 a day. Combined, the poverty, corruption and social disparity pose a threat to Mubarak's regime at a time when he and his son have been unable to improve the lives of the country's poor."

"German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle invoked Tunisia Wednesday, saying the unrest in Egypt 'underlines the necessity of democratization, of respect for human and civil rights.'"

>> ^spoco2:

Sorry, but without any sort of background, I can't upvote at all.
Why are they revolting? What has been done to them? Etc. etc.
All I'm seeing is a collection of violent protesters, and that never makes me side with them without really good reason.
I've tried looking into it, but have found nothing that really deals with what their grievances actually are.


Or maybe I do not understand what 'tried looking into it' meant. If so, my apologies.

spoco2 says...

@GDGD well, I did actually google, but I used 'Egyptian Revolution'... as, well, you know, that's what this video was tagged as.

That gave me articles about the 1952 and 1919 ones, then also a link to this very video, and then some articles about it that all assumed you already knew what it was all about.

I did actually provide a LINK as to what I found when I looked at my local trusted news sources (ABC Australia is usually pretty good), but then I guess you just like pointing out things that you know that other people don't.

Everyone has different points of reference, no need to get snippy.

SDGundamX says...

This was a great Sift, @nomino. And that quote is the best part of the video. Bravo.

EDIT: I must admit that when I saw that guy, a part of me thought he was going to shout "This...is... EGYYYYYYYYYYYPT!"

vaporlock says...

Israel and the US probably won't let this happen. The only hope is that Obama ignores it, and Israel has some alternative reason for letting it happen. Arab people ruling themselves is something that is greatly feared. The politics of the region has been culled of rational political options by cruel men. Good luck people of Egypt.

ghark says...

>> ^vaporlock:

Israel and the US probably won't let this happen. The only hope is that Obama ignores it, and Israel has some alternative reason for letting it happen. Arab people ruling themselves is something that is greatly feared. The politics of the region has been culled of rational political options by cruel men. Good luck people of Egypt.


Yes it's sad, i'm picturing right now some bile spilling out of Hillary Clinton's mouth about how the current uprising is trying to pervert the course of justice.

Gallowflak says...

Somehow, this seems really, really tacky.

Edit : Although the clip quoted in this sift's description needs to be repeated in all coverage of this event. Let's see if the media pay as much attention to this as they did to, for example, Terry Jones, when they desperately attempted to manufacture hysteria.

And Spoco, relying on one news outlet is like information malnutrition. You'll end up stunted... and besides, Australian journalistic standards are pretty god-awful.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/

http://www.reuters.com/

http://english.aljazeera.net/

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Main_Page

... and many others, none of which I would rely on individually but, after a process of info amalgamation, it's possible to end up with a mildly accurate picture of what's going on.

coolhund says...

I am curious, does the American media mention that most of these "revolting states" have had their government established and/or actively supported by America and other western countries?
Because, when I see people here actually asking why they are revolting, I cant really believe many know the truth.

notarobot says...

I'm not surprised that western news media has by in large missed this issue of *worldaffairs. If you weren't already paying attention (and I wasn't) it might appear to have happened very quickly.

TheSofaKing says...

>> ^nomino:

It started in Tunisia about a month ago and democracy is starting to spread to neighbouring countries in the middle east....




pfffftt! Iraq has had Democracy WAY longer then those N00Bs!

bcglorf says...

>> ^ghark:

>> ^vaporlock:
Israel and the US probably won't let this happen. The only hope is that Obama ignores it, and Israel has some alternative reason for letting it happen. Arab people ruling themselves is something that is greatly feared. The politics of the region has been culled of rational political options by cruel men. Good luck people of Egypt.

Yes it's sad, i'm picturing right now some bile spilling out of Hillary Clinton's mouth about how the current uprising is trying to pervert the course of justice.


This mentality makes me really sick. The Egyptian people are trying to overthrow the dictator that's ruled them for nearly 30 years now. Do you really have to drag America and Israel into the mix? Seriously, if they hadn't been aiding and working with Egypt's leadership for the last 30 years, you'd have been cursing them for hating on the Egyptian people. Now today, for ever having worked with Egypt's government, here you are hating on them again.

Focus on this, the Egyptian people are finally rising up and stand a chance at moving out of the dictatorship they are under. One might deem it more appropriate to focus on the trials they face and the challenges before them. Lay off your hatred long enough to show some compassion and support for the Egyptian people that should be the REAL focus of this video.

vaporlock says...

I think your misreading something about our comments. Anyway, here's a good tweet on the current situation http://twitter.com/SultanAlQassemi# Looks like change might actually happen.>> ^bcglorf:

>> ^ghark:
>> ^vaporlock:
Israel and the US probably won't let this happen. The only hope is that Obama ignores it, and Israel has some alternative reason for letting it happen. Arab people ruling themselves is something that is greatly feared. The politics of the region has been culled of rational political options by cruel men. Good luck people of Egypt.

Yes it's sad, i'm picturing right now some bile spilling out of Hillary Clinton's mouth about how the current uprising is trying to pervert the course of justice.

This mentality makes me really sick. The Egyptian people are trying to overthrow the dictator that's ruled them for nearly 30 years now. Do you really have to drag America and Israel into the mix? Seriously, if they hadn't been aiding and working with Egypt's leadership for the last 30 years, you'd have been cursing them for hating on the Egyptian people. Now today, for ever having worked with Egypt's government, here you are hating on them again.
Focus on this, the Egyptian people are finally rising up and stand a chance at moving out of the dictatorship they are under. One might deem it more appropriate to focus on the trials they face and the challenges before them. Lay off your hatred long enough to show some compassion and support for the Egyptian people that should be the REAL focus of this video.

GDGD says...

Via ANTI* Net-Neutrality

The concept of internet neutrality is as it exists today (for the most part), an open bastion for anyone who wants to, being able to express themselves in a multitude of ways.

I wish we had a better name for it, like Liberty Net or something. Everyone tends to hear the neutrality part as neutering or neutralizing, when in fact it is trying to express that the net should not have limits/censorship/bias.

>> ^blankfist:

Their government shut off the internet. In unrelated news, the US moves to give government absolute control over the internet via Net Neutrality.

Psychologic says...

>> ^blankfist:

It's not the term "Net Neutrality" I have a problem with.


Do you feel that internet companies should be allowed to block content from their competition?

Should they be allowed to block otherwise legal content for arbitrary reasons?

honkeytonk73 says...

Umm.. and the US has supported this dictator. Gave it funds. Sent their prisoners there to be tortured so that it could be done 'under the radar'. I wonder how this will all end. I am even more curious to WATCH how the US government reacts and handles this. If you notice, they have been quite subdued about it. So much for Freedom(tm). The difference between Iraq and Egypt. Egypt went along with what the US asked of it, as long as it didn't bother it about it's dictatorship.

malakai says...

Um, the BBC website has had this story, or something at least related to it on the front page since the riots first happened.

If you go there right now a front page story is about the Egyptian president dismissing the cabinet and defending the country's security forces.

Then again, the BBC website is usually good for world news.

>> ^notarobot:

I'm not surprised that western news media has by in large missed this issue of worldaffairs. If you weren't already paying attention (and I wasn't) it might appear to have happened very quickly.

imstellar28 says...

You would wish such a thing on someone? From what I can see, democracy doesn't have the best track record especially here in the US in the last few decades. Just what they need, a McDonald's at every corner and a Haliburton running the government.

How about a prosperous, fair, and just government and leave it at that? No need to impart (force) our flawed values on the rest of world; lest you forget it's the democratic US that is backing the very authoritarian dictator Egypt is revolting against...

Democracy is a plague, and this is one of it's many petulant symptoms. Mubarak is a puppet, installed and supported with the help of the US...learn it for yourself instead of parroting the blind patriotism of your beloved "democracy."

I bet it sounds noble of you to those who don't know better, though.

>> ^Ti_Moth:

Good luck people of Egypt I wish you a prosperous, secular, fair and democratic government. (You will need the luck).

rottenseed says...

Mubarak needs to get his shit together and keep his animals docile and content. Give them the illusion of freedom, an abundance of "must-see-tv" and all the cheap fast food anybody could ask for. A hungry dog is an angry dog, but a satisfied dog will lick the peanut butter off your balls and ask for more...

Xax says...

From Wikipedia:

The 2011 Egyptian protests are a series of street demonstrations, protests, and civil disobedience acts that have been taking place in Egypt since 25 January 2011. The demonstrations and riots began in the weeks after the successful Tunisian uprising, and many protesters are carrying Tunisian flags as a symbol of their influence. Specific grievances have centered around legal and political as well as economic issues: police brutality, state of emergency laws, lack of free elections, corruption, restrictions on freedom of speech, high unemployment, low minimum wages, insufficient housing, food price inflation, and poor living conditions. Mohamed ElBaradei, seen as the most likely candidate for an interim presidency, called for the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak as a possible objective.

As of January 29, at least 95 protester deaths had been reported (27 in Suez, 23 in Alexandria, 45 in Cairo), along with 10 policemen. 750 policemen and 1,500 protesters have been injured. The capital city of Cairo has been described as "a war zone", and the port city of Suez has been the scene of frequent violent clashes. The Egyptian government has attempted to break up and contain protests using a variety of methods. Anti-riot police groups have been responding to areas with shields, rubber bullets, batons, water cannons, tear gas and, in some cases, live ammunition. For the most part, the protest response has been non-lethal, although there have been fatalities. The government turned off almost all Internet accessand imposed a curfew, claiming that minimizing disruption from the protests is necessary to maintain order and to prevent an uprising of fundamentalist Islamic groups.

International response to the protests has generally been supportive with most governments and organizations calling for non-violent responses on both sides and peaceful moves towards reform. The protests have captured worldwide attention due to the increasing integration of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and other social media platforms that have allowed activists and onlookers to communicate, coordinate, and document the events as they occur. As the level of publicity has increased, the Egyptian government has made increasing efforts to limit internet access, especially to social media. On the eve of major planned protests on Friday, 28 January, a nationwide internet and mobile phone "blackout" began, though before dawn the following morning it was reported that the blackout for cell phones had ended.

AnimalsForCrackers says...

>> ^imstellar28:

You would wish such a thing on someone? From what I can see, democracy doesn't have the best track record especially here in the US in the last few decades. Just what they need, a McDonald's at every corner and a Haliburton running the government.
How about a prosperous, fair, and just government and leave it at that? No need to impart (force) our flawed values on the rest of world; lest you forget it's the democratic US that is backing the very authoritarian dictator Egypt is revolting against...
Democracy is a plague, and this is one of it's many petulant symptoms. Mubarak is a puppet, installed and supported with the help of the US...learn it for yourself instead of parroting the blind patriotism of your beloved "democracy."
I bet it sounds noble of you to those who don't know better, though.
>> ^Ti_Moth:
Good luck people of Egypt I wish you a prosperous, secular, fair and democratic government. (You will need the luck).



The US government sometimes does wrong/unjustifiable/corrupt things. The US's government is a democracy. Therefore, all democracy or democracy itself is wrong/unjustifiable/corrupt.

Care to tell us how this makes sense (i.e. follows logically) and what your alternative is?

Ti_Moth says...

>> ^imstellar28:

You would wish such a thing on someone? From what I can see, democracy doesn't have the best track record especially here in the US in the last few decades. Just what they need, a McDonald's at every corner and a Haliburton running the government.
How about a prosperous, fair, and just government and leave it at that? No need to impart (force) our flawed values on the rest of world; lest you forget it's the democratic US that is backing the very authoritarian dictator Egypt is revolting against...
Democracy is a plague, and this is one of it's many petulant symptoms. Mubarak is a puppet, installed and supported with the help of the US...learn it for yourself instead of parroting the blind patriotism of your beloved "democracy."
I bet it sounds noble of you to those who don't know better, though.
>> ^Ti_Moth:
Good luck people of Egypt I wish you a prosperous, secular, fair and democratic government. (You will need the luck).



Just because democracy in the U.S. is a two party farce doesn't mean the Egyptian people shouldn't strive to reach some democratic ideal.

"It has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried."
Sir Winston Churchill

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