Tom Cruise Hates Motion Smoothing

Tom Cruise & Christopher McQuarrie on the set of Top Gun Maverick both explain why you should turn off motion smoothing (video interpolation).
Sarzysays...

YES! Whoever invented motion smoothing is a monster. It's the worst thing to happen to cinema since colorization. It wouldn't be so bad if it weren't turned on by default, which means that a whole bunch of people who aren't tech-savvy wind up leaving it on and then wonder why movies look so weird.

siftbotsays...

Promoting this video and sending it back into the queue for one more try; last queued Wednesday, December 5th, 2018 10:51am PST - promote requested by Sarzy.

Sniper007says...

There's a whole specialty field called "display calibration" that goes deep, deep down this rabbit hole. And yes, they (Tom Cruise and the guy whose name you can't hear because Tom interrupts him) are correct. Motion smoothing is violating image fidelity. It should be turned off.

We are stuck with 24 frames per second in movies, forever. Peter Jackson tried 48 frames per second with The Hobbit. It failed because it felt like the "soap opera effect".

But in almost all other video contexts, more FPS is better. Obviously in gaming more is better. YouTube supports up to 60 FPS, as does most decent recording software these days.

The blue shift that almost every TV has when on display is also a result of funky default settings. The human eye perceives a blue light as slightly brighter than a full spectrum light with the same intensity. So it works to sell TVs. And when you switch it off the default color scheme, you're first impression will be that the picture looks muted or even yellowish. This is because you are accustomed to seeing way to much blue.

If you are a true video aficionado, you'll get yourself a color meter for a few hundred bucks and do an amateur display calibration on your set.

If you are a video psycho (of if you sell faithful video experiences to an audience like in a theater) you'll hire a professional to come out with a high end spectrophotometer and calibrate each display input properly using a standardized video source.

BSRsays...

Not to mention that people might shy away from buying that brand tv again. Then will buy a different brand and end up with the same thing.

The effect reminds me of when they switched to video making soap operas back in the early 70's.

TY for the promo!

Sarzysaid:

YES! Whoever invented motion smoothing is a monster. It's the worst thing to happen to cinema since colorization. It wouldn't be so bad if it weren't turned on by default, which means that a whole bunch of people who aren't tech-savvy wind up leaving it on and then wonder why movies look so weird.

spawnflaggersays...

I think it was originally intended for sports broadcasts that were 1080i (interlaced), and fast left-right camera pans would create a lot of tearing.

I hate smoothing (soap-opera-effect) too.
I have a friend who likes it though, and got mad at me when I changed his TV settings to disable it.

Sarzysaid:

YES! Whoever invented motion smoothing is a monster. It's the worst thing to happen to cinema since colorization. It wouldn't be so bad if it weren't turned on by default, which means that a whole bunch of people who aren't tech-savvy wind up leaving it on and then wonder why movies look so weird.

spawnflaggersays...

RTINGS.com reviews TVs in-depth, and also provide color calibration info (within the Settings, or sometimes hidden menu) for each TV model they review. If your TV is on there, it's worth trying their settings before spending money on a calibration device+software.

Sniper007said:

There's a whole specialty field called "display calibration" that goes deep, deep down this rabbit hole...
If you are a true video aficionado, you'll get yourself a color meter for a few hundred bucks and do an amateur display calibration on your set.

jimnmssays...

I should watch it as the film makers intended. Do film makers intend to make me sick? I literally feel nauseous when watch movies on a big screen in the theater at 24fps. It's not as bad on TV's though. It's one of the reasons I don't go to theaters.

BSRsays...

Christopher McQuarrie (who was interrupted by Tom) gets his revenge at the end of the video as it cuts Tom's last word.

Sniper007said:

And yes, they (Tom Cruise and the guy whose name you can't hear because Tom interrupts him) are correct.

spawnflaggerjokingly says...

But HDTVs are getting so cheap these days, pretty soon it will also be 3rd world problem

I just saw a T-Mobile ad that if you sign up and buy a Samsung phone, they'll throw in a 55" Samsung UHDTV for free.

Paybacksaid:

First. World. Problems.

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