siftbot says...

Promoting this video and sending it back into the queue for one more try; last queued Wednesday, March 28th, 2012 10:30am PDT - promote requested by Boise_Lib.

bobknight33 says...

Sounds right. Presidents don't have control of gas prices as the left blamed Bush back when he was president. But there is a big difference between Obama and other presidents.


Under this administration there have been massive amount of printing money. Remember QE1, QE2 and possible QE3 have done nothing except debase our currency which has caused inflation. Gas prices will not come down to any great extent but will only go up along with everything else.

Sagemind says...

So many mixed messages in there.

I think a large amount of the population is running at bare minimum as it is. When I was young, we used to go for "Drives" and do "road Trips" just for the sake of it. Now we can't afford it.

We have to budget our trips into town so we do as many things as we can in each trip. We don't make extra trips to friend's places that live more than a few kilometers away, We don't even drive into town to shop at the mall or go to Costco or whatever.

It seems like freedom of movement has just taken care of itself. We can't move around if we can't afford it. And we can't afford it if they keep raising the prices on us.

15% less? I already use around 50% less than I did 15 years ago and the prices still go up.
Modern SUVs are still more economical than the Boats we used to drive 20-30 years ago.
15 years ago, when we bought our new car - we were exited that it only cost $22 to fill the tank. We now pay $70 - Can that be right?

JiggaJonson says...

My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.

My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.

When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).

WIN!

EvilDeathBee says...

>> ^JiggaJonson:

My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.
My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.
When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).
WIN!


I'd prefer a diesel over a hybrid.

zombieater says...

>> ^JiggaJonson:

My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.
My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.
When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).
WIN!


As far as your complaint goes, I think you're reasoning for leasing is inherently flawed.

The rate of failure for Honda's hybrid battery: 0.002% of cars ever sold.
The rate of failure for Toyota's hybrid battery: 0.003% of cars ever sold.

It just doesn't happen.

Moreover, in Toyota, the warranty covers any hybrid battery failure for 100,000 miles (in CA it's 150,000 miles) and the cost of replacement (if that should occur) has dropped to under $3000.

Source: http://www.hybridcars.com/components-batteries/first-numbers-hybrid-battery-failure.html

vaire2ube says...

who is bobknight and why does he know exactly what people dont want to hear?

is he a former sifter of infamy?

Sounds a lot like BillO, another celebrity name ..

JiggaJonson says...

>> ^zombieater:

>> ^JiggaJonson:
My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.
My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.
When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).
WIN!

As far as your complaint goes, I think you're reasoning for leasing is inherently flawed.
The rate of failure for Honda's hybrid battery: 0.002% of cars ever sold.
The rate of failure for Toyota's hybrid battery: 0.003% of cars ever sold.
It just doesn't happen.
Moreover, in Toyota, the warranty covers any hybrid battery failure for 100,000 miles (in CA it's 150,000 miles) and the cost of replacement (if that should occur) has dropped to under $3000.
Source: http://www.hybridcars.com/components-batteries/first-n
umbers-hybrid-battery-failure.html


Before we start pointing the "inherently flawed" finger around, maybe you should get your own ducks in a row.

First off, the numbers that they use in the source you cited are skewed. They used the numbers of batteries that failed out of warranty and compared that with the total cars made (as opposed to the total failures out of warranty) *makes fapping motion*

Second, there seem to be gobs of people on the site you cited (heh homonyms) that have had battery problems:
http://www.hybridcars.com/news/civic-hybrid-owners-disappointed-battery-software-fix-28450.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/important-info-honda-ima-warranty.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/ima-battery-and-fix.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/2003-hch-battery-t1155.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/civic-hybrid-battery-ima-problems.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/civic-hybrid-battery-ima-problems-ii.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/replacing-hybrid-battery-t1289.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/news2/first-gen-hybrid-batteries.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/cold-weather-or-corrupted-battery.html
*fap fap fap*
Shall I go on???

So much for "It just doesn't happen."

At your request, I'll look up some more scholarly research on the subject. Until then:

messenger says...

HAhahahah! O'Reilly calling for a "strong leader" to "explain dubious associations" is *comedy gold. Any such leader would have their hands full just with O'Reilly's dubious tide-goes-in-tide-goes-out associations, let alone all of Fox's.

Yogi says...

>> ^JiggaJonson:

>> ^zombieater:
>> ^JiggaJonson:
My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.
My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.
When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).
WIN!

As far as your complaint goes, I think you're reasoning for leasing is inherently flawed.
The rate of failure for Honda's hybrid battery: 0.002% of cars ever sold.
The rate of failure for Toyota's hybrid battery: 0.003% of cars ever sold.
It just doesn't happen.
Moreover, in Toyota, the warranty covers any hybrid battery failure for 100,000 miles (in CA it's 150,000 miles) and the cost of replacement (if that should occur) has dropped to under $3000.
Source: http://www.hybridcars.com/components-batteries/first-n
umbers-hybrid-battery-failure.html

Before we start pointing the "inherently flawed" finger around, maybe you should get your own ducks in a row.
First off, the numbers that they use in the source you cited are skewed. They used the numbers of batteries that failed out of warranty and compared that with the total cars made (as opposed to the total failures out of warranty) makes fapping motion
Second, there seem to be gobs of people on the site you cited (heh homonyms) that have had battery problems:
http://www.hybridcars.com/news/civic-hybrid-own
ers-disappointed-battery-software-fix-28450.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/important-info-honda-ima-warranty.html

http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/ima-battery-and-fix.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/2003-hch-battery-t1155.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/civic-hybrid-battery-ima-problems.html

http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/civic-hybrid-battery-ima-problems-i
i.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/replacing-hybrid-battery-t1289.html http://www.hybridcars.com/news2/first-gen-hybrid-batteries.html
http://www.hybridcars.com/forums/cold-weather-or-corrupted-battery.html

fap fap fap
Shall I go on???
So much for "It just doesn't happen."
At your request, I'll look up some more scholarly research on the subject. Until then:



You do realize that car companies can create fake identities and post them. Hell the oil companies probably pay for a service that does this. I'm sorry but a bunch of links to ONE SITE isn't going to prove a fucking thing. You should be smarter than that.

JiggaJonson says...

@Yogi
The site was suspicious from the get-got b/c it's called "hybridcars.com" -_-
I was merely pointing out that on the same site that was posted, as I stated, many people have had problems with batteries. That's relevant to point out when someone claims "It just doesn't happen" and uses said source as their only source.

Furthermore, half of the links I posted, from the same site, concern entire groups of warranty owners or car purchasers see: (which was posted before) http://www.hybridcars.com/news/civic-hybrid-owners-disappointed-battery-software-fix-28450.html

So you're suggesting that the oil company owns this site, and crafted a story about how an entire group of Honda owners had a problem with their batteries while maintaining the rest of the site which, admittedly, touts the greatness of hybrid cars?

"You should be smarter than that"

xxovercastxx says...

>> ^EvilDeathBee:

>> ^JiggaJonson:
My wife drives a hybrid and pays $60 a month filling up her tank twice a month.
My advice to you sirs, is to get a hybrid and LEASE it for 3 years. If you lease it, then, yes, you're not building equity with the car, but it alleviates the biggest complaint about hybrid cars: replacing the battery means you'll negate any savings on gas.
When her lease is up, we simply roll it over into another lease, with another 3 year warranty (which covers the battery during those three years as well).
WIN!

I'd prefer a diesel over a hybrid.


Bingo! I've been driving a VW Golf TDI for over 9 years now. I pay fuel costs comparable to a hybrid without all the extra costs of owning a hybrid.

Even in the dead of a NY winter, I don't have any problems. You pour a splash of fuel additive in when it gets down in the single digits and that's that. No block heater, no garage. Just wait 30s for the glow plugs and then turn the key and go.

NetRunner says...

I love how the comment thread is almost entirely about hybrid car battery failure, and not about gas prices or politically-motivated spin.

For me, these clips are cause for a bit of soul-searching. I honestly don't recall exactly what I was saying about gas prices in 2008, but I certainly was saying Bush was at least partly to blame.

I didn't really have much proof of that, it was mostly "Bush is an oil man, and under his Presidency gas went from $1.50 to $4, so he's got to have something to do with it."

Mostly though, I think the real answer is that we do live in a free market economy, and oil price is set largely by supply and demand. The global supply has been flat, and possibly declining, while demand has been growing (mostly due to economic development in places like China and India).

The truth is we should have been making serious attempts to get ourselves off oil since at least the 70's, and because we've let Big Oil and their political allies have their way, worldwide, we're now reaching the point where the consequences of our apathy and/or defeat are becoming impossible to ignore.

Now it gets to 80 degrees in March in Ohio, gasoline costs $4/gal, and still the only remediation our political system seems likely to implement is more investment in oil production.

That could change quickly, of course. All we really need is for the right to wake up. Or drop dead. I'd be satisfied with either one at this point.

lampishthing says...

That printing money thing sounded reasonable to me so I looked up currencies for backup. Being in Ireland where the price of petrol is the equivalent of 8.33 USD per gallon which my driving friends tell me is up about 25% these past 6 months it seemed like a global thing to me. ANYWAY.

I found a cool applet for showing historical exchange rates.
Really neat exchange rate thingy
I found it informative to take base as USD and the foreign exchanges as Euro, GBP & Chinese Yuan

These websites show historical oil prices for all those currencies:

Oil_vs_USD

Oil_vs_EUR

Oil_vs_GBP

Oil_vs_CNY

I looked at 180 days history for the above graphs.


As you can see, all the oil price graphs have a similar shape and have indeed gone up about 25% for all currencies. Also, you can see that none of the currencies have moved very much with respect to the USD. So yeah, either they're all printing money (CHINA DOES NOT NEED TO, for defs, yo) or the oil prices are not cos America's printing money.

I did actually look for counter-examples in surging economies but even AUD and CAD show the same jump. If anything, that the exchange rates wrt these countries have gone down and the commodity price of oil has gone up for all of them at a similar rate is a positive for the states.


So yeah, I don't accept your hypothesis.
>> ^bobknight33:

Sounds right. Presidents don't have control of gas prices as the left blamed Bush back when he was president. But there is a big difference between Obama and other presidents.

Under this administration there have been massive amount of printing money. Remember QE1, QE2 and possible QE3 have done nothing except debase our currency which has caused inflation. Gas prices will not come down to any great extent but will only go up along with everything else.

zombieater says...

>> ^JiggaJonson:

>> ^zombieater:
>> ^JiggaJonson:
<blah>

<blah>

<blah>


Just because there are comments posted of people recounting stores of battery failure does not dispute the numbers that I cited. Granted, that's post-warranty, but that also means that the cars are older and are more prone to fail.

Also, some hybrids that are out today give lifetime warranties on their batteries! The Hyundai Sonata hybrid is one.

Ultimately, it's your choice weather to lease or buy, but I'd agree that it's a great choice either way. I made the plunge and purchased a Toyota Prius a few years ago.

My apologies if you felt slighted by the "inherently flawed" comment.

conan says...

I'd give my left arm for 4 USD a gallon. Right now we're at 7,57 USD a gallon (1,50 EUR per liter). And that's for diesel, which is subsidized over here. I'm happy i don't need Super (Premium you call it i think), regular isn't sold here anymore.

ChaosEngine says...

>> ^conan:

I'd give my left arm for 4 USD a gallon. Right now we're at 7,57 USD a gallon (1,50 EUR per liter). And that's for diesel, which is subsidized over here. I'm happy i don't need Super (Premium you call it i think), regular isn't sold here anymore.


Yeah, I really have no time for americans complaining about gas prices. Forget a hybrid or a diesel, just buy a small car.

And OT: my main issue with hybrids is their environmental impact. Sure on road, they're a great idea, but not so much once you amortise the energy cost of the life cycle of the vehicle. You want to be environmentally friendly and save money. Buy an oldish car with a small engine.

playlists with this video:
who voted against this video:

Send this Article to a Friend



Separate multiple emails with a comma (,); limit 5 recipients






Your email has been sent successfully!

Manage this Video in Your Playlists

Beggar's Canyon

 • view